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Correction to: The action of herbal medicine on the libido: aspects of nutritional intervention in increasing sexual desire

  • Amanda Cássia da Cruz1,
  • Natália Gonçalves Guerra1,
  • Kerolayne Esper Barão Pacelhe de Souza1,
  • Izabella de Castro Eleutério1,
  • Leidhaiane Custódia da Silva1,
  • Elaine Gomes Otoni1,
  • Michelle Rosa Andrade Alves1 and
  • Wiliam César Bento Regis2, 3, 4Email author
Nutrire201843:5

https://doi.org/10.1186/s41110-018-0063-4

Received: 26 January 2018

Accepted: 26 January 2018

Published: 12 February 2018

The original article was published in Nutrire 2017 42:29

Correction to: Nutrire (2017) 42:29 DOI: 10.1186/s41110-017-0051-0

The original version of this article [1], published on 5 November 2017, contains a mistake. The abbreviation “NO” has been incorrectly translated as “nitrous oxide”. The correct translation is “nitric oxide”. A list of the affected text parts is given below. The corrected terminology is marked in bold.
  • Some herbal medicines stood out, including Tribulus terrestris, used to increase testosterone serum levels; Eurycoma longifólia, which, in addition to the increased testosterone serum levels, also leads to an increased biosynthesis of several androgens; ginseng, which increases energy levels and stimulates smooth muscle relaxation with nitric oxide; Maca (Lepidium meyenii), which improves sexual performance, in addition to having androgenic effects; and Mondia whitei (ginger), which improves the libido and erection.

  • Studies referring to neurotransmitters in the sexual response for both genders have demonstrated that they are released by autonomic nervous terminations, such as acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenalin, melanocortin (VIP), and nitric oxide (NO) [8, 9].

  • This occurs through the increase in the number of several hormone and serum testosterone concentrations, which, in turn, stimulated the dopamine receptor, through mechanisms, such as vasodilation, the generation of nitric oxide, increased androgen, and gonadotropin [12].

  • Meanwhile, the saponin content acts to form nitric oxide and may lead to the relaxation of the smooth muscle by means of L-arginine/nitric oxide [12].

  • Use of ginseng has a relaxation effect that modulates the relation between nitric oxide and the cavernous smooth muscle [23]. In this reaction, nitric oxide is released through the vasomolecular endothelium, which leads to the relaxation of the cavernous smooth muscle through the metabolism of calcium and potassium. Both reactions are mediated via nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-GMPc), and the hyperpolarizing action takes place through the K channels activated by Ca2.

  • Some studies report that ginsenosides may lead to an increased release of nitric oxide from the cavernous tissue smooth muscles, thus increasing sexual desire [20].

  • Some herbal medicines stood out, including T. terrestris, for increasing testosterone serum levels, and E. longifólia, which also leads to an increased biosynthesis of several androgens; ginseng, which increases energy levels and stimulates smooth muscle relaxation with nitric oxide; Maca (L. meyenii), which improves sexual performance, in addition to having androgenic effects; and Mondia whitei (ginger), which improves the libido and erection.

  • NO: nitric oxide [in the ‘Abbreviations’ section]

  • ↑ Relaxation of the vascular Smooth muscle, ↑ vascular flow to the genitalia, acts on prostaglandin, nitric oxide acts on the guanylate cyclase enzyme. [in the third column of Table 1]

  • Figure 2

  • Figure 4

Fig. 2

Central effects of neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, VIP, nitric oxide, serotonin, and oxytocin) and hormones (testosterone, estrogen, prolactin, and progesterone) in desire, sexual arousal, and orgasm

Fig. 4

Main bioactives of the phytotherapics cited in the studies selected through the keywords “libido, food, and nutrient” in the PUBMED, Scielo, and EMBASE databases

The references which are cited in the above passages can be reviewed in the original article.

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Nutrition Science Department, Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
(2)
Graduate Program in Nutrition and Health Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
(3)
Graduate Program in Infectology and Tropical Medicine Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
(4)
Graduate Program in Vertebrate Biology Pontifical Catholic, University of Minas, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Reference

  1. da Cruz AC, et al. The action of herbal medicine on the libido: aspects of nutritional intervention in increasing sexual desire. Nutrire. 2017;42:29. https://doi.org/10.1186/s41110-017-0051-0.View ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2018

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